• Burmese Offering Vessel or Serving Set
  • Burmese Offering Vessel or Serving Set
  • Burmese Offering Vessel or Serving Set
  • Burmese Offering Vessel or Serving Set
  • Burmese Offering Vessel or Serving Set
  • Burmese Offering Vessel or Serving Set
  • Burmese Offering Vessel or Serving Set
  • Burmese Offering Vessel or Serving Set
  • Burmese Offering Vessel or Serving Set
  • Burmese Offering Vessel or Serving Set
  • Lacquered Offering Bowl Ok Kwet Burma

Burmese Offering Vessel or Serving Set

$950.00

Made of bamboo matting and wooden dowels for the legs then covered with layers upon layers of natural black lacquer to form a hard shell this attractive set is used for offerings of food as well as a complete set to serve the family during religious events.  Possibly from Monywa central Burma who are know for their black lacquered objects. bam

SKU: oasmb014 Categories: , , , Tags: ,

Description

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oasmb014
Bamar (Burmese) people
Central Burma
Offering vessel, Ok-kwet
Bamboo, lacquer and wood
14.5 in across X 15 in. high.
Good condition. Some slight cracking in the lacquer but no flecking or serious chips. Very stable.
$950
Burmese black lacquered Ok kwet
This distinctive stacked serving set was brought to the Buddhist temples during ceremonial observances by the family to give food as a donation. The food would be transported in more utilitarian vessels then transferred to the various compartments of the ok kwet. The large bowl at the base held fragment steamed rice, the deep try would hold steamed dumplings or boiled eggs. Other trays would hold curries, various pickles or balachong, the popular Burmese dry shrimp dish and the top cup would serve tea or soup.
The base would also would double as a religious offering vessel usually filled with flowers for the Buddha.
Made of bamboo matting and wooden dowels for the legs then covered with layers upon layers of natural lacquer to form a hard shell. Black is the color of the oxidized natural lacquer, thit si ; the inner red is from adding cinnabar powder to the natural lac, hinthabada. It’s consisting of two teared trays, one top cup, an inner tray and the large base. There is illegible Burmese writing under the base, which is more than likely a family name. Probably from Monywa, the town of Kyaukka in central Burma who are known for their black lacquered objects and their strength.
19th century.